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OneMind Dog Agility Handling Technique DVD

OneMind Dog Agility Handling Technique DVD




Author: Janita Leinonen and Jaakko Suoknuuti
Format: DVD, NTSC format
Running Time: 52 minutes
Release Date: 2013

Janita Leinonen and Jaakko Suoknuuti of Finland are the developers of the very successful One Mind system, which uses a variety of different handling techniques to help all types of handlers successfully negotiate the sequences they will encounter in agility courses. Practicing different techniques with the dog helps the handler to understand better why and how the dog is reacting to different handling cues.

The Agility Handling Technique 1 DVD presents the following handling skills:

  • Forced front cross
  • German turn
  • Twist
  • Jaakko turn
  • How to turn the dog tightly toward you on the landing side of the jump

Every technique is presented showing the correct execution of the maneuver, how to teach the maneuver to your dog, and the most common mistakes made by handlers when executing the maneuver.

The DVD is suitable for dogs and handlers of all skill levels. The material is presented in Finnish but there are English subtitles.

About the Authors

The authors have achieved much with their dogs, including competing on the Finnish FCI agility team. They have a number of videos on YouTube that you can view.

  • Janita Leinonen: "I have been a professional dog trainer since 2000. Before that I had been an active member in different dog associations. I have done a lot of different work with dogs along the way. Currently I am only concentrating on being an agility trainer. The most important thing for me in dog training is being fair to the dog. You should never ask the dog for things you have not taught him. The reason for the dog not knowing something can always be seen in the mirror."
  • Jaakko Suoknuuti: "I have been an agility instructor since 2003. Agility is the sport that is especially close to my heart. I want to keep developing my skills both as a handler and an instructor. When I work as an instructor I try to get the handlers to understand their dogs and to find a common 'language' to interact with these amazing creatures on an agility course. Dogs can often do things that their handlers think they cannot do. It is important for me to get the handlers to trust and believe in their dogs and also themselves. Trust and teamwork is required in everyday life as well as agility and other dog sports. The dog has to be able to count on the instructions he gets from the handler. The handler has to be able to trust the dog's ability to work independently."